Tuesday, 6 April 2010

Kleeneze - in a magnetic muddle


Just as the supply of complainable adverts had begun to dry up, the cavalry has appeared on the horizon in the form of the Kleeneze Catalogue!



Kleeneze are one of those companies whose agents shove their catalogues through your letterbox every few weeks - in my case, ignoring a polite notice attached to the door, asking them to refrain from doing so.

If even one of these complaints is found to be valid by the ASA, I shudder to think how much it would cost Kleeneze to reprint all of their catalogues.

(The relevant pages are available here, here, here, here, here and here.)

"I write to complain about the Kleeneze catalogue (Spring/Summer 2010).

I suspect that the catalogue may be in breach of two sections of the British Code of Advertising, Sales Promotion and Direct Marketing (CAP) code.

I have submitted scans of as many of the relevant pages as the online complaints form will alow. If you would like to email me, I will send scans of the remaining pages.

I can provide an original copy of the catalogue by post, if required.

1. Kleeneze catalogues are distributed door-to-door by "Kleeneze Distributors". Customers are able to place orders with their distributor, who later delivers goods to the customer's door.

2. The Spring/Summer 2010 catalogue contained two supplementary catalogues, one of which was titled "Health & Beauty". The "Health & Beauty" supplement is the subject of this complaint.

3. The CAP Code, Section 3.1, states "Before distributing or submitting a marketing communication for publication, marketers must hold documentary evidence to prove all claims, whether direct or implied, that are capable of objective substantiation."

4. The CAP Code, Section 50.1, states "Medical and scientific claims made about beauty and health-related products should be backed by evidence, where appropriate consisting of trials conducted on people..."

Page 28 (top left) - "Spa Hot Rocks"

5. Under Sections 3.1 and 50.1, I challenge whether the advertiser holds documentary evidence to prove any of the following claims, and I challenge whether the claims are backed by evidence, where appropriate consisting of trials conducted on people:

(i) Spa Hot Rocks can soothe inflammation
(ii) Spa Hot Rocks can stimulate circulation, assisting the body in self-healing

Page 29 - "Magnetic Therapy" products

6. Under Sections 3.1 and 50.1, I challenge whether the advertiser holds documentary evidence to prove any of the following claims, and I challenge whether the claims are backed by evidence, where appropriate consisting of trials conducted on people:

(i) The Magnetic Knee Support is "ideal for sports injuries or problem joints"
(ii) The Magnetic Elbow Support is suitable for a "painful or injured elbow"
(iii) The Magnetic Wrist Support "ease[s] muscular and joint pain - including repetitive strain and sport injuries..."
(iv) The Magnetic Ankle Support can "reduce swelling and stiffness" and "helps to relieve pain or discomfort in the ankle"
(v) The Magnetic Knee Strap can "aid mobility" and "the magnets help to soothe and ease aches and pains"
(vi) The implied claim that any of the six products on page 29 have any benefits that a non-magnetic product of identical appearance would not have

Page 34 - "Travel Sickness Wristbands"

7. Under Sections 3.1 and 50.1, I challenge whether the advertiser holds documentary evidence to prove the following claim, and I challenge whether the claim is backed by evidence, where appropriate consisting of trials conducted on people:

(i) The wristbands "can offer drug-free relief from nausea and the symptoms of travel sickness"

Page 41 - "Copper Bangle"

8. Under Sections 3.1 and 50.1, I challenge whether the advertiser holds documentary evidence to prove any of the following claims, and I challenge whether the claims are backed by evidence, where appropriate consisting of trials conducted on people:

(i) The implied claim that copper "reduce[s] rheumatic pain and arthritic discomfort"
(ii) The direct claim that "wearing this bangle" brings "wonderful benefits"

Page 42 - "Magnetic Exercise Disc"

9. Under Sections 3.1 and 50.1, I challenge whether the advertiser holds documentary evidence to prove any of the following claims, and I challenge whether the claims are backed by evidence, where appropriate consisting of trials conducted on people:

(i) The direct claim that the Disc "help[s] tone your thighs, waist and stomach"
(ii) The direct claim that "your feet can also benefit from the correctly-placed reflex[ology] studs that stimulate the reflexology points in your feet corresponding to all parts of the body"
(iii) The implied claim that the Disc "invoke[s] the body's natural healing powers"

Page 47 - "Magnetic Insoles"

10. Under Sections 3.1 and 50.1, I challenge whether the advertiser holds documentary evidence to prove the following claim, and I challenge whether the claim is backed by evidence, where appropriate consisting of trials conducted on people:

(i) The Magnetic Insole "reduces muscular aches and pains"

11. I confirm that I have no connections with the advertiser or with the publishing and alternative medicine industries in general. I confirm that I am not involved in legal proceedings with the advertiser.

12. I confirm that I am happy to be identified as the complainant."

3 comments:

  1. You are really rather a pathetic wretched little person spending your time writing this rubbish!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anonymous 5/5 A kleeneze rep perhaps? thinking the householder has to entertain your magazines with no recourse?

    I say the letter is very good.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Everyone has a right to query things. I wanted to know about the Mini Pain Gone but after reading about all the other spurious claims I think I'll not waste my £14.95

      Delete

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