Tuesday, 26 October 2010

Enerjii's "Feel-good vitamins of the air"


Magnetic bracelets are one of the must-have quack accessories of the noughties.


Held to ease pain, heal injuries and improve sporting performance, magnetic bracelets are (needless to say) bullshit.

(Image credit - front side of flyer)

Enerjii UK Ltd
were one of the magnet therapy exhibitors at CamExpo 2010.

Sadly, their implausible flyers (available here, here, here, here, here and here) weren't even the most brazen ones being handed out.
Enerjii reckon their magnetic trinkets can:

"...Ease pain and discomfort caused by Arthritis... Increase energy ...Help in treating headaches and migraine... Aid circulation by increasing blood flow... Give relief from general aches and pains... Increase the flow of oxygen to the brain... Decrease mental tiredness... Give higher mental energy... Aid in relieving physical and mental stress... Alleviate depression... Boost physical energy... Gently heal, soothe and stimulate the physical body as well as the mind... Elevate the surface temperature of the body aiding circulation... May help chronic fatigue; water retention and skin disorders... Aid in detoxification by cleansing the liver and kidneys... Increase blood-flow [sic]... Relieve muscle soreness and spasms..."

I don't believe a single word of that, so another ASA complaint follows.

"I write to complain about three flyers I picked up at the CamExpo exhibition in London on 24th October this year.

The flyers, for Enerjii UK Ltd, promote a set of copper bracelets which are claimed to have miraculous "Health Benefits".

I suspect that the flyers may be in breach of two sections of the British Code of Advertising, Sales Promotion and Direct Marketing (CAP) code (2010). I can provide the original flyers by post, if necessary.

1. The ASA Council has in the past ruled against claims that magnetic therapy products can ease pain (e.g. Complaint Ref 93337).

2. (i) Flyer 1 is titled "pain relief within designer jewellery".

(ii) Flyer 2 is titled "incredible energising jewellery magnificent magnetic & copper 4-in-1 bracelets!".

(iii) Flyer 3 is titled "low in energy, suffering from pain? great looking [sic] & fashionable jewellery known to assist with pain relief"

3. According to Flyer 1:

"Enerjii's energising bracelets have 3 of the earth's [sic] natural energy sources working together in one bracelet. Each Enerjii bracelet contains: Rare Earth Neodymium Magnets - The world's strongest magnetic force. Negative Ions - Feel Good [sic] 'vitamins of the air'. Far Infrared [sic] Rays - Health-giving rays from the sun. Placed next to your skin and blood vessels, these technologies work safely together to enhance your wellbeing [sic]."

4. All three of the flyers contain identical medical claims on their reverse sides. Under Section 12.1 of the CAP Code (2010), I challenge whether any of the following claims can be substantiated:

(i) "Magnetic therapy is known to: Help maintain good health and well-being"
(ii) "...Ease pain and discomfort caused by Arthritis"
(iii) "...Increase energy"
(iv) "...Help in treating headaches and migraine"
(v) "...Aid circulation by increasing blood flow"
(vi) "...Give relief from general aches and pains"

5. All three flyers claim that the bracelets emanate "negative ions" and "Far Infrared [sic]...rays from the sun". Under Section 3.1, I challenge whether the flyers misleadingly imply the bracelets are capable of any of the following benefits:

(i) "Negative Ion therapy is known to: Increase the flow of oxygen to the brain"
(ii) "...Decrease mental tiredness"
(iii) "...Give higher mental energy"
(iv) "...Aid in relieving physical and mental stress"
(v) "...Alleviate depression"
(vi) "...Boost physical energy"
(vii) "Far Infrared [sic] therapy is known to: Gently heal, soothe and stimulate the physical body as well as the mind"
(viii) "...Elevate the surface temperature of the body aiding circulation"
(ix) "...May help chronic fatigue; water retention and skin disorders"
(x) "...Aid in detoxification by cleansing the liver and kidneys"
(xi) "...Increase blood-flow [sic]"
(xii) "...Relieve muscle soreness and spasms"

6. Flyer 2 (only) adds claims about the "Health Benefits of Copper". Under Section 12.1, I challenge whether these claims can be substantiated:

(i) "Copper therapy is known to: Ease stiffness"
(ii) "...Relieve muscular pain"

7. I confirm I have no connections with the advertiser. I confirm I am not involved in legal proceedings with the advertiser."

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